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( - [ number? z ] ... ) number?
With two or more arguments, this procedure returns the difference of its arguments, associating to the left. With one argument, however, it returns the additive inverse of its argument.
( - [ number? z ] ... ) number?
With two or more arguments, this procedure returns the difference of its arguments, associating to the left. With one argument, however, it returns the additive inverse of its argument.
( / [ number? z1 ] [ number? z2 ] ... ) number?
With two or more arguments, this procedure returns the quotient of its arguments, associating to the left. With one argument, however, it returns multiplicative inverse of its argument. It is an error if any argument of / other than the first is an exact zero. If the first argument is an exact zero, an implementation may return an exact zero unless one of the other arguments is a NaN.
( / [ number? z1 ] [ number? z2 ] ... ) number?
With two or more arguments, this procedure returns the quotient of its arguments, associating to the left. With one argument, however, it returns the multiplicative inverse of its argument.
( < [ real? x1 ] [ real? x2 ] [ real? x3 ] ... ) boolean?
This procedure returns #t if its arguments are monotonically increasing, and #f otherwise. If any of the arguments are +nan.0, predicate returns #f. It does not distinguish between inexact zero and inexact negative zero. The predicate is transitive. Note: While it is not an error to compare inexact numbers using this predicate, the results are unreliable because a small inaccuracy can affect the result. When in doubt, consult a numerical analyst.
( <= [ real? x1 ] [ real? x2 ] [ real? x3 ] ... ) boolean?
This procedure returns #t if its arguments are monotonically non-decreasing, and #f otherwise. If any of the arguments are +nan.0, predicate returns #f. It does not distinguish between inexact zero and inexact negative zero. The predicate is transitive. Note: While it is not an error to compare inexact numbers using this predicate, the results are unreliable because a small inaccuracy can affect the result. When in doubt, consult a numerical analyst.
( = [ number? z1 ] [ number? z2 ] [ number? z3 ] ... ) boolean?
This procedure returns #t if its arguments are equal, and #f otherwise. If any of the arguments are +nan.0, the predicate return #f. It does not distinguish between inexact zero and inexact negative zero. This predicate is transitive. Note: While it is not an error to compare inexact numbers using this predicate, the results are unreliable because a small inaccuracy can affect the result; this is especially true of =. When in doubt, consult a numerical analyst.
( > [ real? x1 ] [ real? x2 ] [ real? x3 ] ... ) boolean?
This procedure returns #t if its arguments are monotonically decreasing, and #f otherwise. If any of the arguments are +nan.0, predicate returns #f. It does not distinguish between inexact zero and inexact negative zero. The predicate is transitive. Note: While it is not an error to compare inexact numbers using this predicate, the results are unreliable because a small inaccuracy can affect the result. When in doubt, consult a numerical analyst.
( >= [ real? x1 ] [ real? x2 ] [ real? x3 ] ... ) boolean?
This procedure returns #t if its arguments are monotonically non-increasing, and #f otherwise. If any of the arguments are +nan.0, predicate returns #f. It does not distinguish between inexact zero and inexact negative zero. The predicate is transitive. Note: While it is not an error to compare inexact numbers using this predicate, the results are unreliable because a small inaccuracy can affect the result. When in doubt, consult a numerical analyst.